The Zen Studies Podcast

Dharma Talks (a bit more personal take on Dharma topics)

37 – Dogen’s Genjokoan Part 3: Seeking, Self-Nature, and the Matter of Life-and-Death

watch go tips for writing papers in college christopher hitchens and michelle obama thesis https://www.nypre.com/programs/tips-writing-my-resume/37/ define thesis writing buy viagra online without script https://pittsburghgreenstory.com/newyork/essay-proofreader/15/ islam essay https://bigsurlandtrust.org/care/mixing-viagra-pain-killers/20/ buy school papers online follow site ah english dissertation https://climbingguidesinstitute.org/762-popular-school-scholarship-essay-topics/ international assignment services quality essay writing help for students master's thesis length http://v-nep.org/classroom/type-thesis/04/ go follow https://dvas.org/ordering-celais-10312/ here cv ghostwriters for hire au ib cas essay sample why can't i send email on my iphone 7 see url essay introduction sentences https://www.go-gba.org/8392-essay-on-my-favorite-place/ https://www.nypre.com/programs/homework-help-experts/37/ do my essay for me uk go here In part 3 of my series on the famous Zen text called “Genjokoan,” written in 1233 by Japanese Zen master Eihei Dogen, I discuss the sections about seeking the Dharma, riding in a boat (recognizing self-nature is impermanent), and firewood and ash (the Great Matter of Life-and-Death).

read more

14 – Buddha’s Teachings Part 1: The Three Marks and the Teaching of Not-Self (Anatta)

This episode explains several of the Buddha's first teachings: the Three Marks and the teaching of Anatta, or Not-Self. From the beginning, the Buddha's teachings featured the Three Marks, or Characteristics, of Existence: anicca (impermanence), dukkha (dissatisfactoriness), and anatta (not-self). Here I introduce the Three Characteristics and then go into the teaching of not-self in detail - what it means and doesn't mean. For example, did you know the Buddha did not teach that we have no self?

read more
Share