150 – Zazen as the Dharma Gate of Joyful Ease

150 – Zazen as the Dharma Gate of Joyful Ease

In this episode I focus on how zazen is the dharma gate of joyful ease, because experiencing it as such is so profoundly restorative at a time when our lives tend to be stressful in many ways. I also think it’s necessary to explore the way in which zazen is the dharma gate of joyful ease because that dharma gate is subtle and can be elusive because to enter it we have to let go of all of our normal ways of operating.

Mini Episode – A Four “S” Approach to Shikantaza: Sit Upright, Still, Silent, Simply Be

Mini Episode – A Four “S” Approach to Shikantaza: Sit Upright, Still, Silent, Simply Be

Shikantaza, or the practice of “just sitting,” can be challenging. We’re asked not to try to control our meditative experience, but are we just supposed to sit there like a sack of potatoes and let habit energy have its way? I present a simple approach to returning to your intention whenever you have a moment of awareness in your sitting, and making that intention very simple and free from expectation of results. We simply intend four “S’s”: To sit upright, still, silent, and simply be.

122 – Meditation Is NOT About Stopping Thoughts

122 – Meditation Is NOT About Stopping Thoughts

Non-meditators, beginners, and long-time Buddhist practitioners alike tend to believe meditation is all about stopping our thoughts. This is a serious misunderstanding, and, sadly, keeps many people from embracing the practice of meditation. It’s very important to understand the true purpose and function of meditation, because the vast majority of us find it impossible to stop our thoughts, at least through willful effort. In this episode, I talk about why we long to be thought-free. Then I discuss how meditation is not about stopping thought, but instead is a practice of diligently and repeatedly turning our attention to something beyond thought, thereby realigning our whole being. Meditation requires diligence and determination, but also patience, humility, and faith.

Mini Episode – A Four “S” Approach to Shikantaza: Sit Upright, Still, Silent, Simply Be

113 – Clarification: It’s Okay to Use Multiple Types of Meditation

Two clarifications about my teaching on meditation: First, in my enthusiastic endorsement of shikantaza or, “just sitting,” I may have given the impression I think a real Zen student would only sit shikantaza. I want to go on record saying it’s fine to use multiple types of meditation in your practice. Second, I seem to have communicated the idea there’s no place in Zen for paying attention to, learning from, and working with your thoughts and feelings, at least not in meditation. In my tradition we tend to do this work off the meditation seat, but there’s no reason you shouldn’t devote some or all of your meditation time to it, if you find that fruitful.

96 – A Zazen Pamphlet: Essential (and Brief) Instructions for the Practice of Zazen

96 – A Zazen Pamphlet: Essential (and Brief) Instructions for the Practice of Zazen

I challenged myself to write instructions for the practice of zazen that would fit on letter-sized, tri-fold brochure – 8 ½ by 11 inches, two sided. I figured I’d share it here on the podcast – and if this episode is too short for you, I recommend listening to it twice, because this “pamphlet” really does, to my mind, capture the essence of shikantaza! (At least as I think of it right now).

84 – Two Paths to Meditative Concentration: Directed Effort Versus Letting Go – Part 2

83 – Two Paths to Meditative Concentration: Directed Effort Versus Letting Go – Part 1

I believe some of our struggles in meditation could be eased if we recognized there are two paths to meditative concentration, or samadhi – directed effort, and letting go – and what works well for one person may be frustrating and fruitless for another. In this episode I briefly discuss what samadhi is, and then describe the two very different ways to achieve it. In the next episode I’ll describe the “letting go” approach in more detail.

80 – Four Foundations of Mindfulness Practice and Similarities in Zen

80 – Four Foundations of Mindfulness Practice and Similarities in Zen

In the last episode, I introduced the Four Foundations of Mindfulness as the Buddha taught them. Mindfulness means to remember something, or keep something in mind. The Four Foundations are the four categories of things you keep in mind if you want to walk the path to spiritual liberation. In this episode I talk about how the Four Foundations of Mindfulness are actually practiced, and then about how this teaching relates to Zen.

79 – Buddha’s Teachings 10: The Four Foundations of Mindfulness

79 – Buddha’s Teachings 10: The Four Foundations of Mindfulness

One of Buddha’s central teachings was the Four Foundations of Mindfulness – basically, how you walk the Eightfold Path to liberation. Mindfulness, or sati, means to remember or keep in mind, and the four foundations are the four things you should keep in mind (or focus on) if you want to progress on the spiritual path. In this first episode of two on the Four Foundations of Mindfulness, I’ll introduce the teaching as given by the Buddha. In the next episode, I’ll reflect on actual practice of this teaching, and how all its elements are included in Zen but parsed out differently.

69 – The Soto Zen Goal of Goallessness: How to Awaken Without Trying

69 – The Soto Zen Goal of Goallessness: How to Awaken Without Trying

The goal of Buddhism, including Zen, is to awaken to what’s true, because the truth is liberating. And yet my tradition, Soto Zen, points us toward the “goal of goallessness,” telling us we’ll awaken if only we give up our desire for anything else (including achieving some “goal” called awakening). Our Soto Zen practice is just sitting, without making any effort to influence our meditative experience. In this episode I’ll [TK] explore how the “goal of goallessness” points to the fact that if we willfully try to awaken, we create duality and get in our own way. Fortunately, Zen offers us ways to awaken without trying.

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